Posts tagged gay marriage

Hello, LGBT Youth! Now Take a Stance and Pay It Forward!
Kids today don’t know how good they have it. I came out at 30. While my friends had no problems with my newfound gayness, to this day my family still won’t talk about it. In contrast, our newest college intern at OneGoodLove came out publicly at 15. His friends embraced him, his extended family gave him a standing ovation, and his mother decided to write a book about it. The world has changed.
In light of the recent Supreme Court rulings in favor of marriage equality, there is no doubt that things have gotten better. The federal government is finally recognizing and fighting for LGBT equality, mainstream media have been flooded with positive images of LGBT role models, and support networks like the Trevor Project and PFLAG are more vibrant than ever. It is therefore not surprising that the average age for LGBT youth to come out has dropped from 23 to 16 in recent years.
While all of these gains have helped change the tide, I believe that technology has amplified these societal shifts to allow LGBT youth to come out at earlier ages. With the youth generation perpetually entrenched in their laptops, cellphones, and iPads, young LGBT people have constant access to the aforementioned role models and support systems, which tell LGBT youth that their emotions and attractions are not aberrant but normal and regular, perhaps even extraordinary. And technology has allowed these messages and support networks to spread this hope to a larger subset of the population than ever before.
So a questioning kid in Columbus, Ohio, can now quietly call the Trevor Hotline from his bedroom while watching an “It Gets Better” video on YouTube and streaming an episode ofModern Family. When he’s ready, he can post a status on Facebook declaring himself a “newfound gayby.” And when 300 of his friends from all over the world like his status and leave him messages of congratulations, he may finally have the courage to kick down the closet door, walk downstairs, and come out to his parents.
Thus, though they’re still far from perfect, things have gotten better, and much of the LGBT youth culture is benefiting from these recent social gains. However, we cannot let that be enough. It is ironic that the increased support and connectivity that has resulted from the technology boom has also led many young people to become disconnected and despondent. We cannot let this happen if we want to continue to grow as individuals and a community.
So I urge the youth culture to take a stand. To the LGBT youth who have come out early, benefiting from the social gains that your older counterparts fought for: Don’t let that be good enough for you. Get out there and give back or fight on. It is important to note that “it gets better” implies a perpetual progression. Though life may be good as it is, it will continue to get better. So further the social benefits and gains for your generation and the ones to come, and remember that progress dies when the current generation says, “That’s good enough for us.”


 

Hello, LGBT Youth! Now Take a Stance and Pay It Forward!

Kids today don’t know how good they have it. I came out at 30. While my friends had no problems with my newfound gayness, to this day my family still won’t talk about it. In contrast, our newest college intern at OneGoodLove came out publicly at 15. His friends embraced him, his extended family gave him a standing ovation, and his mother decided to write a book about it. The world has changed.

In light of the recent Supreme Court rulings in favor of marriage equality, there is no doubt that things have gotten better. The federal government is finally recognizing and fighting for LGBT equality, mainstream media have been flooded with positive images of LGBT role models, and support networks like the Trevor Project and PFLAG are more vibrant than ever. It is therefore not surprising that the average age for LGBT youth to come out has dropped from 23 to 16 in recent years.

While all of these gains have helped change the tide, I believe that technology has amplified these societal shifts to allow LGBT youth to come out at earlier ages. With the youth generation perpetually entrenched in their laptops, cellphones, and iPads, young LGBT people have constant access to the aforementioned role models and support systems, which tell LGBT youth that their emotions and attractions are not aberrant but normal and regular, perhaps even extraordinary. And technology has allowed these messages and support networks to spread this hope to a larger subset of the population than ever before.

So a questioning kid in Columbus, Ohio, can now quietly call the Trevor Hotline from his bedroom while watching an “It Gets Better” video on YouTube and streaming an episode ofModern Family. When he’s ready, he can post a status on Facebook declaring himself a “newfound gayby.” And when 300 of his friends from all over the world like his status and leave him messages of congratulations, he may finally have the courage to kick down the closet door, walk downstairs, and come out to his parents.

Thus, though they’re still far from perfect, things have gotten better, and much of the LGBT youth culture is benefiting from these recent social gains. However, we cannot let that be enough. It is ironic that the increased support and connectivity that has resulted from the technology boom has also led many young people to become disconnected and despondent. We cannot let this happen if we want to continue to grow as individuals and a community.

So I urge the youth culture to take a stand. To the LGBT youth who have come out early, benefiting from the social gains that your older counterparts fought for: Don’t let that be good enough for you. Get out there and give back or fight on. It is important to note that “it gets better” implies a perpetual progression. Though life may be good as it is, it will continue to get better. So further the social benefits and gains for your generation and the ones to come, and remember that progress dies when the current generation says, “That’s good enough for us.”

 

New Dating Site Caters To LGBTs Looking For Soul Mates Not Hookups

Head east down Santa Monica, and as you drive through West Hollywood, you will see the gayest billboard ever. Standing proud above Palm Car Wash is a gigantic photo of two men kissing and the words, “First Comes Love, Then Comes Marriage.” It’s part of the ad campaign for OneGoodLove, the only dating website for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender singles seeking marriage or long-term relationships, which launches at a rather opportune time.

Since the landmark defeats of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) and Proposition 8, the LGBT community has taken to their new marriage rights like no ones’ business. A recent survey of LGBT individuals indicates that 76 percent of all gay and lesbian singles now see marriage in their future, with 58 percent identifying marriage as their ultimate dating goal. In fact, the LGBT community has surged ahead their straight counterparts, with only 61 percent of straight singles harboring any sort of intent of getting married.

Furthermore, the marriage equality rulings have affected more than just the LGBT community. While 41 percent of gay and lesbian respondents report that their families already see same-sex relationships as a positive thing, more than a third stated that the recent cultural shifts and gains in marriage equality would help their parents see their personal same-sex relationships in a more positive light.

Thus, with marriage on the mind, OneGoodLove’s billboard not only fits in perfectly with the relationship goals emerging in the LGBT community, but also presents the gayest version of love—not “gay” in the pejorative sense, but gay as in the traditional sense—gay as in happy, gay as in joyful, and gay as in fully accepting. It suggests that in this new era of marriage equality, love is the defining factor in marriage, and with it, any couple is free to say, “I do.”


Full story here: http://www.queerty.com/new-dating-site-caters-to-lgbts-looking-for-soul-mates-not-hookups-20130730/#ixzz2b8ObYzZL

Source: queerty.com

Frank Mastronuzzi and OneGoodLove.com win the 2013 NGLCC Pitch Competition. — at National Gay & Lesbian Chamber of Commerce-NGLCC.
OneGoodLove.com Reports 63 Percent of Gay and Lesbian Singles Are More Likely To Consider Marriage As Their Dating Goal After DOMA Ruling Site’s “Marriage Equality State of the Date Report” Looks at Same-Sex Love and Marriage in the Wake of Supreme Court Rulings
Los Angeles, CA—July 25, 2013—In light of the recent Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) ruling, OneGoodLove (http://www.onegoodlove.com), the Internet’s leading relationship-focused online dating service for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) singles, announced today the release of its “Marriage Equality State of the Date Report.” Findings of the report, based on a survey of 875 LGBT singles, suggest that while the Supreme Court ruling on DOMA and California’s Proposition 8 aren’t putting social pressure on gay and lesbian people to immediately “tie the knot,” many gay and lesbian singles are now more likely to consider marriage their ultimate relationship goal because of the court’s recent landmark decisions.  Improved Outlook on Marriage Since the DOMA Ruling
Sixty-three percent of LGBT singles surveyed said they were more likely to think of marriage as their ultimate dating goal now that the Supreme Court has struck down the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), with only 35 percent saying that their outlooks have not changed.   When asked whether or not the recent cultural shifts and gains in marriage equality would help their parents see their same-sex relationships in a more positive light, 37 percent of the LGBT participants said yes, 22 percent said no, and 41 percent said that their parents already see their relationships as a positive thing. Thirty-eight percent of the transgender respondents said that the cultural shifts and gains in marriage equality would help their parents see their relationships in a more positive light, but only 13 percent said that their parents already see their relationships as a positive thing. Eighty-seven percent of all LGBT singles reported that increases in same-sex marriage rights would not increase the societal pressure on them to settle down and tie the knot.
LGBT Marriage Material
Forty-four percent of gay and lesbian singles reported that honesty was the most important quality for a future husband or wife to have. Thirteen percent of lesbian women reported intelligence as the most important quality in a future wife, and 15 percent of gay men said a sense of humor was the most important quality in a husband. Thirty-seven percent of all participants said that communication was the most important personal quality they would have to improve to make a future marriage work. Twenty percent said they would have to get their lives in better financial order to marry and live happily ever after.  Seventy-six percent of all gay and lesbian singles surveyed said they see marriage in their future. Only 66 percent of bisexual and 50 percent of transgender singles see marriage in their future.
LGBT Wedding Bells Ringing
Forty-two percent of all LGBT participants said they wanted a small wedding gathering of just friends and family, and 24 percent said they wanted a low-key ceremony and reception. Only six percent of gay men wanted an “over the top party with everyone they had ever known,” while 18 percent of bisexual and 14 percent of lesbian singles wanted the same. None of the transgender respondents wanted an over the top wedding.
 “This survey points to the tangible, romantic hopefulness in the gay and lesbian community right now,” said Frank Mastronuzzi, Co-founder and Chief Love Officer at OneGoodLove.com. “  Commemorating that hopefulness, on July 17, OneGoodLove.com launched a billboard in West Hollywood, California, reflecting the shifting dating and relationship goals emerging in the LGBT community.  The billboard features two men kissing, with copy that reads:  First Comes Love, Then Comes Marriage
For survey details, and to see the billboard, visit the OneGoodLove blog at:  blog.onegoodlove.comContact Frank Mastronuzzi at:  Frank AT onegoodlove.com   About OneGoodLove.com: OneGoodLove.com is the first online dating site built specifically for relationship-minded gay and lesbian singles. Co-founded by Frank Mastronuzzi, former senior manager of business development at Match.com, and Nic Marlin, Internet entrepreneur and marketing executive, the site’s mission is to offer gay and lesbian singles a better way to meet life mates, while also directly challenging the stereotype that gay and lesbian dating is primarily promiscuous. The site’s proprietary Personality Profile Test and matching algorithm was formulated specifically for gay and lesbian singles, based on analysis of long-term lesbian and gay relationships. oneGoodLove.com is committed to giving back to the LGBT community through corporate volunteerism and donations to LGBT non-profits.
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OneGoodLove.com Reports 63 Percent of Gay and Lesbian Singles Are More Likely To Consider Marriage As Their Dating Goal After DOMA Ruling
 
Site’s “Marriage Equality State of the Date Report” Looks at Same-Sex Love and Marriage in the Wake of Supreme Court Rulings

Los Angeles, CA—July 25, 2013—In light of the recent Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) ruling, OneGoodLove (http://www.onegoodlove.com), the Internet’s leading relationship-focused online dating service for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) singles, announced today the release of its “Marriage Equality State of the Date Report.” Findings of the report, based on a survey of 875 LGBT singles, suggest that while the Supreme Court ruling on DOMA and California’s Proposition 8 aren’t putting social pressure on gay and lesbian people to immediately “tie the knot,” many gay and lesbian singles are now more likely to consider marriage their ultimate relationship goal because of the court’s recent landmark decisions.
  
Improved Outlook on Marriage Since the DOMA Ruling

Sixty-three percent of LGBT singles surveyed said they were more likely to think of marriage as their ultimate dating goal now that the Supreme Court has struck down the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), with only 35 percent saying that their outlooks have not changed.  
 
When asked whether or not the recent cultural shifts and gains in marriage equality would help their parents see their same-sex relationships in a more positive light, 37 percent of the LGBT participants said yes, 22 percent said no, and 41 percent said that their parents already see their relationships as a positive thing.
 
Thirty-eight percent of the transgender respondents said that the cultural shifts and gains in marriage equality would help their parents see their relationships in a more positive light, but only 13 percent said that their parents already see their relationships as a positive thing.
 
Eighty-seven percent of all LGBT singles reported that increases in same-sex marriage rights would not increase the societal pressure on them to settle down and tie the knot.

LGBT Marriage Material

Forty-four percent of gay and lesbian singles reported that honesty was the most important quality for a future husband or wife to have. Thirteen percent of lesbian women reported intelligence as the most important quality in a future wife, and 15 percent of gay men said a sense of humor was the most important quality in a husband.
 
Thirty-seven percent of all participants said that communication was the most important personal quality they would have to improve to make a future marriage work. Twenty percent said they would have to get their lives in better financial order to marry and live happily ever after. 
 
Seventy-six percent of all gay and lesbian singles surveyed said they see marriage in their future. Only 66 percent of bisexual and 50 percent of transgender singles see marriage in their future.

LGBT Wedding Bells Ringing

Forty-two percent of all LGBT participants said they wanted a small wedding gathering of just friends and family, and 24 percent said they wanted a low-key ceremony and reception.
 
Only six percent of gay men wanted an “over the top party with everyone they had ever known,” while 18 percent of bisexual and 14 percent of lesbian singles wanted the same. None of the transgender respondents wanted an over the top wedding.

 “This survey points to the tangible, romantic hopefulness in the gay and lesbian community right now,” said Frank Mastronuzzi, Co-founder and Chief Love Officer at OneGoodLove.com. “  Commemorating that hopefulness, on July 17, OneGoodLove.com launched a billboard in West Hollywood, California, reflecting the shifting dating and relationship goals emerging in the LGBT community.  The billboard features two men kissing, with copy that reads:  First Comes Love, Then Comes Marriage


For survey details, and to see the billboard, visit the OneGoodLove blog at:  
blog.onegoodlove.com
Contact Frank Mastronuzzi at:  Frank AT 
onegoodlove.com
 
  
About 
OneGoodLove.com
OneGoodLove.com is the first online dating site built specifically for relationship-minded gay and lesbian singles. Co-founded by Frank Mastronuzzi, former senior manager of business development at Match.com, and Nic Marlin, Internet entrepreneur and marketing executive, the site’s mission is to offer gay and lesbian singles a better way to meet life mates, while also directly challenging the stereotype that gay and lesbian dating is primarily promiscuous. The site’s proprietary Personality Profile Test and matching algorithm was formulated specifically for gay and lesbian singles, based on analysis of long-term lesbian and gay relationships. oneGoodLove.com is committed to giving back to the LGBT community through corporate volunteerism and donations to LGBT non-profits.

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Can You Date Someone Who Is Significantly Older or Younger Than You?

People put a lot of limits on themselves when it comes to dating. They may want someone who looks a certain way, who makes a certain amount of money, or who likes certain hobbies. Age is one of the biggest reasons people have for rejecting someone. There are people who only like to date people their age and won’t budge no matter what.

I confess to having a preference in this department as well. I will not date women who are more than six years younger than me or women who are more than ten years older. Years of dating experience tell me this is the right age group for me. However, I also try to be flexible. Dating is hard and if your preferences are carved in stone, you could miss out on a lot of great people. Therefore, if someone seems really fantastic I will usually waive my strict age requirements. (Though as a 36 year old, I’d never date someone less than 25 or over 50. That, I can’t see ever working, no matter how charming she may be.)

Here are my thoughts on what to consider if you decide to date significantly above or below your age:

I think the biggest challenge with dating young people is that they are not always so mature, and also they are in a different place in their life. If you are 45, can you really relate to a grad student? Do you really want to go out with them every weekend, clubbing and dancing? Will you really have a meeting of the minds? These are all things to think about and mull over carefully. I think it is particularly a bad idea to date a young person who has just come out, when you are an older person. The younger person is really not sure of herself or her sexuality at this stage, and you will wind up playing “teacher.” I think this kind of relationship only works if the younger person is extremely mature, or if the older person is slightly immature. Some of us may be 45, but act 25, and vice versa. But if the maturity levels are too different, this won’t be a relationship that succeeds in the long term.

If you are dating an older person it may work—but only if you are in your late twenties and beyond. Anything younger than that I think is just asking for trouble. As a young person in your late twenties or early thirties, you may not relate to others in your age category, and you may do better with someone older.

Whichever direction you go in, one thing you can’t worry about is what other people think. Friends, family or strangers may see fit to comment on your relationship—or even make fun of it. In the end, that doesn’t matter. All that matters ultimately is what you think of each other.

Public Displays of Affection For Gay & Lesbian Couples

For a heterosexual couple, public displays of affection are usually no big deal. Nobody is going to get upset if they see a man and woman kissing on the street. But with gays and lesbians it’s a different story.

This is something I realized right after my first relationship. My first relationship was a heterosexual one, and back then, I never felt uncomfortable showing affection in public. But when I entered a lesbian relationship it became much more complex. I felt like all eyes were on me whenever I made any move towards my partner. Even kissing my partner in a deserted part of town by the water where no one was watching felt unsafe. After all, anybody could come upon us at any minute and discover what we were doing. And who knows what would happen then? (Yes, I do admit to being a bit paranoid.)

You may think I live in the Midwest but actually I live in New York City, and even in this liberated city, it is a very rare sight for me to see two men or two women being affectionate with each other, unless it’s at a club or other kind of gay event. Turns out it’s not just me—a lot of other gay men and women are paranoid too. And it’s understandable why: you simply never know the reaction someone is going to have. Just because you live in New York, it doesn’t mean everyone is pro-gay.

And then there are some gay people who don’t like being lovey-dovey in public, and it has nothing to do with fear. They don’t want to be put on display. They believe love is for the bedroom. That’s understandable as well. Just because you are gay doesn’t mean you are comfortable with public displays of your sexuality.

If you feel uncomfortable with public displays of affection, for whatever reason, discuss it with your partner. Don’t just reject him or her without giving a reason. That’s the worst thing you could do and will lead to major tension within your relationship.

Explain why you feel wary about it. Some gays and lesbians are afraid of public displays of affection because they’ve been harassed before while kissing a partner. If that has happened to you, tell your partner about it. It will help her to understand your fear better.

In addition, it can be a problem even if both of you like PDAs. You may not mind a public display of affection once in a while, but the girlfriend who constantly wants to grab your butt in public is a problem. She is trying to say to the world: “This is my possession and you can’t have it.” Do you really want to go out with someone like that?

Whatever you do, don’t let your partner pressure you into doing something you are uncomfortable with. Don’t let her make you feel guilty, or make you feel like it’s your duty as an activist to showcase your relationship in front of straight people. It’s not your duty to do that; it’s only your duty to be happy. 

To start showing Public Displays of Affection, why not find your life partner on OneGoodLove.com now.

Use promo code “FINDLOVE” at check out and get 20% off all subscriptions! Don’t wait and act now

Source: onegoodlove.com

Are You Turning Off Potential Dates?

 

Sometimes, no matter how hard we try to present ourselves in a positive light, we end up turning off potential mates. You only have one chance to make a good first impression, so here are a few things to avoid doing the next time you are out on a date.

 1. Being too needy.

I think one of the worst things you can do on a date is to ask during the middle of it: “How do you think things are going so far?” It puts a lot of pressure on your date, and makes you look needy, like you need instant confirmation of how the date is going, because you are so insecure about yourself.  

We may act needy on a date because there’s a lot of pressure on the date to be a success. Maybe you haven’t had a relationship in a few years and you really want this date to work out. What you need to do is put that pressure aside for a while. Don’t worry how the date is going, just have fun while it is happening, be relaxed, put your best face forward, and let the chips fall where they may. You can’t force love to happen, and trying to do so will only make you look like a weirdo.

 2. Talking too much.

A good conversation is all about give and take. Listen to what your date is saying so you can respond correctly and create stimulating conversation. If you don’t listen to what he is saying and just spout stuff you want to spout the whole darn time, he’s going to notice and think you are a bore.

3. Not maintaining eye contact.

One of the most important things you can do during a date is to maintain eye contact. You may feel uncomfortable doing so if you are shy or self-conscious, but you need to get over that. Eye contact is a way of establishing trust. If you avoid looking at a person he will wonder what you are hiding. He might also wonder if you are even really interested in him. This is not the way you want to start off a date. On the same note, though, you don’t want to stare at someone in an obnoxious way. That will make them feel self-conscious and have them feeling defensive.

 4.Not laughing.

Most people want to be with someone who has a sense of humor. If you never laugh during a date, he is going to think you are too stuffy—especially if you are at a comedy club or a funny movie. And if he tells jokes, you should try to laugh or at least smile at some of them, even if you don’t think they’re rip-roaringly funny. It’s just the polite thing to do.

5. Not saying “I had a nice time.”

At the end of a date, you should say you had a good time, even if there were some problems. Always leave the date on a good note because you never know whether this is someone you may want to see in the future.

Gay Romance Revolution!

OneGoodLove.com is the Internet’s first relationship-focused online dating service for gay men and lesbians.  Learn why the company named President Barack Obama their 2013 Honorary Gay Valentine.
Founded by Frank Mastronuzzi, former senior manager at Match.com, the site’s mission is to offer gay and lesbian singles a better way to meet life mates, while also directly challenging the stereotype that the gay and lesbian dating community is primarily promiscuous.
Mastronuzzi is a nationally recognized LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) flirting and dating expert, and somewhat of a statistician on what’s hot and not so hot in the world of lesbian and gay romance.  Co-Founder Nicholas Marlin has learned what works in the world of dating. His authentic and soft approach to advice allows him to gracefully coach anyone through the process of becoming a successful dater.
SnowbizNow with Nicholas Snow!
Facebook  Twitter  SnowbizNow.com  HuffPost  YouTube  Actor Info Advertise/Donate

Gay Romance Revolution!

OneGoodLove.com is the Internet’s first relationship-focused online dating service for gay men and lesbians.  Learn why the company named President Barack Obama their 2013 Honorary Gay Valentine.

Founded by Frank Mastronuzzi, former senior manager at Match.com, the site’s mission is to offer gay and lesbian singles a better way to meet life mates, while also directly challenging the stereotype that the gay and lesbian dating community is primarily promiscuous.

Mastronuzzi is a nationally recognized LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) flirting and dating expert, and somewhat of a statistician on what’s hot and not so hot in the world of lesbian and gay romance.  Co-Founder Nicholas Marlin has learned what works in the world of dating. His authentic and soft approach to advice allows him to gracefully coach anyone through the process of becoming a successful dater.

SnowbizNow with Nicholas Snow!

Facebook  Twitter  SnowbizNow.com  HuffPost  YouTube  Actor Info Advertise/Donate

LGBT State Of The Date Reveals Optimistic Views On Dating, Romance: OneGoodLove Survey (Click on Image for Huff Po Article)

The dating scene can be like diving into a shark tank, but lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) singles are highly optimistic that 2013 will bring true love.
A staggering 87 percent of LGBT singles surveyed in a new poll are optimistic they will find love over the year, with 39 percent identifying themselves as “very” or “extremely” optimistic. The survey also found that lesbians have the edge over gay men when it comes to their optimism. 
Read More Here

LGBT State Of The Date Reveals Optimistic Views On Dating, Romance: OneGoodLove Survey (Click on Image for Huff Po Article)

The dating scene can be like diving into a shark tank, but lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) singles are highly optimistic that 2013 will bring true love.

A staggering 87 percent of LGBT singles surveyed in a new poll are optimistic they will find love over the year, with 39 percent identifying themselves as “very” or “extremely” optimistic. The survey also found that lesbians have the edge over gay men when it comes to their optimism. 

Read More Here


OneGoodLove.com Announces Valentine’s 2013 “LGBT State of the Date Report”
65% of LGBT Singles More Likely to Desire Marriage As States Pass Marriage-Rights Laws  

Los Angeles, CA – February 11, 2013—OneGoodLove.com (www.onegoodlove.com), the Internet’s leading relationship-focused online dating service for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) singles, announced today the release of its Valentine’s 2013 “LGBT State of the Date Report.” The report, based on a survey of over 500 LGBT singles using OneGoodLove, as well as analysis of the stated dating preferences of OneGoodLove’s more than 150,000 members, is a Valentine’s Day snapshot of LGBT dating experiences today.
Gay And Lesbian Daters Are Optimistic About Love And Marriage
Eighty-seven percent of LGBT singles surveyed are optimistic they will find love in 2013, with 39% reporting they are “very” or “extremely” optimistic.  Lesbians are slightly more optimistic than gay men.
Sixty-five percent of gay and lesbian singles report that as states pass laws providing same-sex marriage rights, they find themselves more likely to consider marriage as their long-term dating goal.  Gay men (68%) were more likely than lesbians (58%) to say this.
Somewhat contradictory, when oneGoodLove.com members are asked directly by other members about their relationship goal, only 8% claim “I am looking for marriage.”  LGBT singles, like their hetersexual counterparts, may not want to scare away prospective romantic partners by making marriage the topic of first date conversations.
What LGBT Singles Want
When asked about the one quality that might make them fall in love with a romantic partner, 64% of gay men indicated it was someone who made them feel special, 23% indicated a great sense of humor, 7% indicated attractiveness, and 5% indicated intelligence.  
Forty-five percent of lesbians report sense of humor as the one quality most likely to make them fall in love, followed by 42% who might fall in love with a woman who made them feel special.  Eleven percent of lesbians might fall in love with a woman due to her intelligence.  
Not a single lesbian (0%), and only 1% of gay men surveyed, said being good in bed was the quality most likely to make them fall in love with a potential romantic partner.
Eighty-seven percent of OneGoodLove members are open to meeting a partner with an ethnicity different from their own.  
Forty-one percent reported that they wanted children one day. 
Almost half of LGBT singles don’t want to date a drinker, and 64% of gay men, and 60% of lesbians, don’t want to date a smoker.  Smoking status was the matching criteria rated most important to oneGoodLove singles. 
Fifty-two percent of OneGoodLove singles said their ideal first date is a dinner date.  
Thirty-six percent of gay men, and 41% of lesbians, are willing to travel 50 miles to meet the right date.
Technology and LGBT Dating
LGBT singles reported they are more flirtatious in person (37%), or while texting (36%), than they are using email (15%), while on Facebook (6%), or over the phone (6%).  Not a single LGBT person reported they were the most flirtatious on Twitter (0%), which was one of the possible answers.
When asked their opinion regarding the worst romantic transgression made with technology or social networks, 55% of LGBT singles said breaking up with someone via text or email.  13% said changing your relationship status on your social network to “single” before notifying the person you were dating about the change.  11% said cyber stalking a potential romantic partner, and 10% said speaking badly in your social networks about an ex.
What Moms and Dads Want for LGBT Singles
When asked to report what their parents, “deep in their hearts,” hoped the ultimate outcome of their dating lives would be, 73% of LGBT singles said said their parents would want them to be in a happy, loving relationship with someone of the same sex, while 23% said their parents would prefer them to be in a heterosexual relationship, even if it wasn’t loving or fulfilling.  Four percent reported their parents would want them to be in a loving relationship, fully out as a transgender man or woman.
Lesbians were more likely (32%) to say their parents would want them to be in a heterosexual relationship, even if it wasn’t loving or fulfilling, than were gay men (20%).

“As same-sex marriage rights are achieved state by state, and with a president who has unequivocally stated he is on the side of full rights and equality for the LGBT community, there’s never been a  more promising Valentine’s season for LGBT singles hoping to find their one special someone,” said Frank Mastronuzzi, Co-founder and Chief Love Officer at OneGoodLove.com.  Mastronuzzi is featured inDan Slater’s just-released book, Love in the Time of Algorithms, which looks at the development of the online dating industry and what technology means for the future of relationships. "

Visit the OneGoodLove blog at : blog.onegoodlove.com
Contact Frank Mastronuzzi at:  Frank AT onegoodlove.com
Contact Dan Slater at:  danielbslater AT gmail.com
About ONEGOODLOVE.COM: oneGoodLove.com is the first online dating site built specifically for relationship-minded gay and lesbian singles.  Co-founded by Frank Mastronuzzi, former senior manager of business development at Match.com, and Nic Marlin,  Internet entrepreneur and marketing executive, the site’s mission is to offer gay and lesbian singles a better way to meet life mates, while also directly challenging the stereotype that gay and lesbian dating is primarily promiscuous.  The site’s proprietary Personality Profile Test and matching algorithm was formulated specifically for gay and lesbian singles, based on analysis of long-term lesbian and gay relationships. oneGoodLove.com is committed to giving back to the LGBT community through corporate volunteerism and donations to LGBT non-profits. Early investors include Tim Sullivan, CEO of Ancestry.com, and former CEO at Match.com, Bret McAlister, CTO of 1-800Dentist, Fred Joyal, and investment strategist and capital formation expert, Anqelique DeMaison.
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ZoomInfo

OneGoodLove.com Announces Valentine’s 2013 “LGBT State of the Date Report”
65% of LGBT Singles More Likely to Desire Marriage As States Pass Marriage-Rights Laws  

Los Angeles, CA – February 11, 2013—OneGoodLove.com (www.onegoodlove.com), the Internet’s leading relationship-focused online dating service for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) singles, announced today the release of its Valentine’s 2013 “LGBT State of the Date Report.” The report, based on a survey of over 500 LGBT singles using OneGoodLove, as well as analysis of the stated dating preferences of OneGoodLove’s more than 150,000 members, is a Valentine’s Day snapshot of LGBT dating experiences today.
Gay And Lesbian Daters Are Optimistic About Love And Marriage
Eighty-seven percent of LGBT singles surveyed are optimistic they will find love in 2013, with 39% reporting they are “very” or “extremely” optimistic.  Lesbians are slightly more optimistic than gay men.
Sixty-five percent of gay and lesbian singles report that as states pass laws providing same-sex marriage rights, they find themselves more likely to consider marriage as their long-term dating goal.  Gay men (68%) were more likely than lesbians (58%) to say this.
Somewhat contradictory, when oneGoodLove.com members are asked directly by other members about their relationship goal, only 8% claim “I am looking for marriage.”  LGBT singles, like their hetersexual counterparts, may not want to scare away prospective romantic partners by making marriage the topic of first date conversations.
What LGBT Singles Want
When asked about the one quality that might make them fall in love with a romantic partner, 64% of gay men indicated it was someone who made them feel special, 23% indicated a great sense of humor, 7% indicated attractiveness, and 5% indicated intelligence.  
Forty-five percent of lesbians report sense of humor as the one quality most likely to make them fall in love, followed by 42% who might fall in love with a woman who made them feel special.  Eleven percent of lesbians might fall in love with a woman due to her intelligence.  
Not a single lesbian (0%), and only 1% of gay men surveyed, said being good in bed was the quality most likely to make them fall in love with a potential romantic partner.
Eighty-seven percent of OneGoodLove members are open to meeting a partner with an ethnicity different from their own.  
Forty-one percent reported that they wanted children one day. 
Almost half of LGBT singles don’t want to date a drinker, and 64% of gay men, and 60% of lesbians, don’t want to date a smoker.  Smoking status was the matching criteria rated most important to oneGoodLove singles. 
Fifty-two percent of OneGoodLove singles said their ideal first date is a dinner date.  
Thirty-six percent of gay men, and 41% of lesbians, are willing to travel 50 miles to meet the right date.
Technology and LGBT Dating
LGBT singles reported they are more flirtatious in person (37%), or while texting (36%), than they are using email (15%), while on Facebook (6%), or over the phone (6%).  Not a single LGBT person reported they were the most flirtatious on Twitter (0%), which was one of the possible answers.
When asked their opinion regarding the worst romantic transgression made with technology or social networks, 55% of LGBT singles said breaking up with someone via text or email.  13% said changing your relationship status on your social network to “single” before notifying the person you were dating about the change.  11% said cyber stalking a potential romantic partner, and 10% said speaking badly in your social networks about an ex.
What Moms and Dads Want for LGBT Singles
When asked to report what their parents, “deep in their hearts,” hoped the ultimate outcome of their dating lives would be, 73% of LGBT singles said said their parents would want them to be in a happy, loving relationship with someone of the same sex, while 23% said their parents would prefer them to be in a heterosexual relationship, even if it wasn’t loving or fulfilling.  Four percent reported their parents would want them to be in a loving relationship, fully out as a transgender man or woman.
Lesbians were more likely (32%) to say their parents would want them to be in a heterosexual relationship, even if it wasn’t loving or fulfilling, than were gay men (20%).

“As same-sex marriage rights are achieved state by state, and with a president who has unequivocally stated he is on the side of full rights and equality for the LGBT community, there’s never been a  more promising Valentine’s season for LGBT singles hoping to find their one special someone,” said Frank Mastronuzzi, Co-founder and Chief Love Officer at OneGoodLove.com.  Mastronuzzi is featured inDan Slater’s just-released book, Love in the Time of Algorithms, which looks at the development of the online dating industry and what technology means for the future of relationships. "

Visit the OneGoodLove blog at : blog.onegoodlove.com
Contact Frank Mastronuzzi at:  Frank AT onegoodlove.com
Contact Dan Slater at:  danielbslater AT gmail.com
About ONEGOODLOVE.COM: oneGoodLove.com is the first online dating site built specifically for relationship-minded gay and lesbian singles.  Co-founded by Frank Mastronuzzi, former senior manager of business development at Match.com, and Nic Marlin,  Internet entrepreneur and marketing executive, the site’s mission is to offer gay and lesbian singles a better way to meet life mates, while also directly challenging the stereotype that gay and lesbian dating is primarily promiscuous.  The site’s proprietary Personality Profile Test and matching algorithm was formulated specifically for gay and lesbian singles, based on analysis of long-term lesbian and gay relationships. oneGoodLove.com is committed to giving back to the LGBT community through corporate volunteerism and donations to LGBT non-profits. Early investors include Tim Sullivan, CEO of Ancestry.com, and former CEO at Match.com, Bret McAlister, CTO of 1-800Dentist, Fred Joyal, and investment strategist and capital formation expert, Anqelique DeMaison.
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ZoomInfo

OneGoodLove.com Announces Valentine’s 2013 “LGBT State of the Date Report”
65% of LGBT Singles More Likely to Desire Marriage As States Pass Marriage-Rights Laws  

Los Angeles, CA – February 11, 2013—OneGoodLove.com (www.onegoodlove.com), the Internet’s leading relationship-focused online dating service for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) singles, announced today the release of its Valentine’s 2013 “LGBT State of the Date Report.” The report, based on a survey of over 500 LGBT singles using OneGoodLove, as well as analysis of the stated dating preferences of OneGoodLove’s more than 150,000 members, is a Valentine’s Day snapshot of LGBT dating experiences today.
Gay And Lesbian Daters Are Optimistic About Love And Marriage
Eighty-seven percent of LGBT singles surveyed are optimistic they will find love in 2013, with 39% reporting they are “very” or “extremely” optimistic.  Lesbians are slightly more optimistic than gay men.
Sixty-five percent of gay and lesbian singles report that as states pass laws providing same-sex marriage rights, they find themselves more likely to consider marriage as their long-term dating goal.  Gay men (68%) were more likely than lesbians (58%) to say this.
Somewhat contradictory, when oneGoodLove.com members are asked directly by other members about their relationship goal, only 8% claim “I am looking for marriage.”  LGBT singles, like their hetersexual counterparts, may not want to scare away prospective romantic partners by making marriage the topic of first date conversations.
What LGBT Singles Want
When asked about the one quality that might make them fall in love with a romantic partner, 64% of gay men indicated it was someone who made them feel special, 23% indicated a great sense of humor, 7% indicated attractiveness, and 5% indicated intelligence.  
Forty-five percent of lesbians report sense of humor as the one quality most likely to make them fall in love, followed by 42% who might fall in love with a woman who made them feel special.  Eleven percent of lesbians might fall in love with a woman due to her intelligence.  
Not a single lesbian (0%), and only 1% of gay men surveyed, said being good in bed was the quality most likely to make them fall in love with a potential romantic partner.
Eighty-seven percent of OneGoodLove members are open to meeting a partner with an ethnicity different from their own.  
Forty-one percent reported that they wanted children one day. 
Almost half of LGBT singles don’t want to date a drinker, and 64% of gay men, and 60% of lesbians, don’t want to date a smoker.  Smoking status was the matching criteria rated most important to oneGoodLove singles. 
Fifty-two percent of OneGoodLove singles said their ideal first date is a dinner date.  
Thirty-six percent of gay men, and 41% of lesbians, are willing to travel 50 miles to meet the right date.
Technology and LGBT Dating
LGBT singles reported they are more flirtatious in person (37%), or while texting (36%), than they are using email (15%), while on Facebook (6%), or over the phone (6%).  Not a single LGBT person reported they were the most flirtatious on Twitter (0%), which was one of the possible answers.
When asked their opinion regarding the worst romantic transgression made with technology or social networks, 55% of LGBT singles said breaking up with someone via text or email.  13% said changing your relationship status on your social network to “single” before notifying the person you were dating about the change.  11% said cyber stalking a potential romantic partner, and 10% said speaking badly in your social networks about an ex.
What Moms and Dads Want for LGBT Singles
When asked to report what their parents, “deep in their hearts,” hoped the ultimate outcome of their dating lives would be, 73% of LGBT singles said said their parents would want them to be in a happy, loving relationship with someone of the same sex, while 23% said their parents would prefer them to be in a heterosexual relationship, even if it wasn’t loving or fulfilling.  Four percent reported their parents would want them to be in a loving relationship, fully out as a transgender man or woman.
Lesbians were more likely (32%) to say their parents would want them to be in a heterosexual relationship, even if it wasn’t loving or fulfilling, than were gay men (20%).

“As same-sex marriage rights are achieved state by state, and with a president who has unequivocally stated he is on the side of full rights and equality for the LGBT community, there’s never been a  more promising Valentine’s season for LGBT singles hoping to find their one special someone,” said Frank Mastronuzzi, Co-founder and Chief Love Officer at OneGoodLove.com.  Mastronuzzi is featured inDan Slater’s just-released book, Love in the Time of Algorithms, which looks at the development of the online dating industry and what technology means for the future of relationships. "

Visit the OneGoodLove blog at : blog.onegoodlove.com
Contact Frank Mastronuzzi at:  Frank AT onegoodlove.com
Contact Dan Slater at:  danielbslater AT gmail.com
About ONEGOODLOVE.COM: oneGoodLove.com is the first online dating site built specifically for relationship-minded gay and lesbian singles.  Co-founded by Frank Mastronuzzi, former senior manager of business development at Match.com, and Nic Marlin,  Internet entrepreneur and marketing executive, the site’s mission is to offer gay and lesbian singles a better way to meet life mates, while also directly challenging the stereotype that gay and lesbian dating is primarily promiscuous.  The site’s proprietary Personality Profile Test and matching algorithm was formulated specifically for gay and lesbian singles, based on analysis of long-term lesbian and gay relationships. oneGoodLove.com is committed to giving back to the LGBT community through corporate volunteerism and donations to LGBT non-profits. Early investors include Tim Sullivan, CEO of Ancestry.com, and former CEO at Match.com, Bret McAlister, CTO of 1-800Dentist, Fred Joyal, and investment strategist and capital formation expert, Anqelique DeMaison.
# # # # #
ZoomInfo

OneGoodLove.com Announces Valentine’s 2013 “LGBT State of the Date Report”

65% of LGBT Singles More Likely to Desire Marriage As States Pass Marriage-Rights Laws  

Los Angeles, CA – February 11, 2013—OneGoodLove.com (www.onegoodlove.com), the Internet’s leading relationship-focused online dating service for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) singles, announced today the release of its Valentine’s 2013 “LGBT State of the Date Report.” The report, based on a survey of over 500 LGBT singles using OneGoodLove, as well as analysis of the stated dating preferences of OneGoodLove’s more than 150,000 members, is a Valentine’s Day snapshot of LGBT dating experiences today.

Gay And Lesbian Daters Are Optimistic About Love And Marriage

Eighty-seven percent of LGBT singles surveyed are optimistic they will find love in 2013, with 39% reporting they are “very” or “extremely” optimistic.  Lesbians are slightly more optimistic than gay men.

Sixty-five percent of gay and lesbian singles report that as states pass laws providing same-sex marriage rights, they find themselves more likely to consider marriage as their long-term dating goal.  Gay men (68%) were more likely than lesbians (58%) to say this.

Somewhat contradictory, when oneGoodLove.com members are asked directly by other members about their relationship goal, only 8% claim “I am looking for marriage.”  LGBT singles, like their hetersexual counterparts, may not want to scare away prospective romantic partners by making marriage the topic of first date conversations.

What LGBT Singles Want

When asked about the one quality that might make them fall in love with a romantic partner, 64% of gay men indicated it was someone who made them feel special, 23% indicated a great sense of humor, 7% indicated attractiveness, and 5% indicated intelligence. 

Forty-five percent of lesbians report sense of humor as the one quality most likely to make them fall in love, followed by 42% who might fall in love with a woman who made them feel special.  Eleven percent of lesbians might fall in love with a woman due to her intelligence. 

Not a single lesbian (0%), and only 1% of gay men surveyed, said being good in bed was the quality most likely to make them fall in love with a potential romantic partner.

Eighty-seven percent of OneGoodLove members are open to meeting a partner with an ethnicity different from their own. 

Forty-one percent reported that they wanted children one day.

Almost half of LGBT singles don’t want to date a drinker, and 64% of gay men, and 60% of lesbians, don’t want to date a smoker.  Smoking status was the matching criteria rated most important to oneGoodLove singles.

Fifty-two percent of OneGoodLove singles said their ideal first date is a dinner date. 

Thirty-six percent of gay men, and 41% of lesbians, are willing to travel 50 miles to meet the right date.

Technology and LGBT Dating

LGBT singles reported they are more flirtatious in person (37%), or while texting (36%), than they are using email (15%), while on Facebook (6%), or over the phone (6%).  Not a single LGBT person reported they were the most flirtatious on Twitter (0%), which was one of the possible answers.

When asked their opinion regarding the worst romantic transgression made with technology or social networks, 55% of LGBT singles said breaking up with someone via text or email.  13% said changing your relationship status on your social network to “single” before notifying the person you were dating about the change.  11% said cyber stalking a potential romantic partner, and 10% said speaking badly in your social networks about an ex.

What Moms and Dads Want for LGBT Singles

When asked to report what their parents, “deep in their hearts,” hoped the ultimate outcome of their dating lives would be, 73% of LGBT singles said said their parents would want them to be in a happy, loving relationship with someone of the same sex, while 23% said their parents would prefer them to be in a heterosexual relationship, even if it wasn’t loving or fulfilling.  Four percent reported their parents would want them to be in a loving relationship, fully out as a transgender man or woman.

Lesbians were more likely (32%) to say their parents would want them to be in a heterosexual relationship, even if it wasn’t loving or fulfilling, than were gay men (20%).

As same-sex marriage rights are achieved state by state, and with a president who has unequivocally stated he is on the side of full rights and equality for the LGBT community, there’s never been a  more promising Valentine’s season for LGBT singles hoping to find their one special someone,” said Frank Mastronuzzi, Co-founder and Chief Love Officer at OneGoodLove.com.  Mastronuzzi is featured inDan Slater’s just-released book, Love in the Time of Algorithms, which looks at the development of the online dating industry and what technology means for the future of relationships. "

Visit the OneGoodLove blog at : blog.onegoodlove.com

Contact Frank Mastronuzzi at:  Frank AT onegoodlove.com

Contact Dan Slater at:  danielbslater AT gmail.com

About ONEGOODLOVE.COM:
oneGoodLove.com is the first online dating site built specifically for relationship-minded gay and lesbian singles.  Co-founded by Frank Mastronuzzi, former senior manager of business development at Match.com, and Nic Marlin,  Internet entrepreneur and marketing executive, the site’s mission is to offer gay and lesbian singles a better way to meet life mates, while also directly challenging the stereotype that gay and lesbian dating is primarily promiscuous.  The site’s proprietary Personality Profile Test and matching algorithm was formulated specifically for gay and lesbian singles, based on analysis of long-term lesbian and gay relationships. oneGoodLove.com is committed to giving back to the LGBT community through corporate volunteerism and donations to LGBT non-profits. Early investors include Tim Sullivan, CEO of Ancestry.com, and former CEO at Match.com, Bret McAlister, CTO of 1-800Dentist, Fred Joyal, and investment strategist and capital formation expert, Anqelique DeMaison.

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